Tag Archives: Life After Beth

Return of the Living Dead 3 and the Best Zombie Romances in Film

Following on from Owen’s recent recommendation on the Failed Critics Podcast for the Vestron re-release of Brian Yuzna’s 90’s cult classic zombie film, Return of the Living Dead 3,  this article takes a look at the undying love found only in this weird but wonderful genre.

Continue reading Return of the Living Dead 3 and the Best Zombie Romances in Film

Advertisements

Life After Beth

Life After Beth is weird and confused and, despite a game Dane DeHaan and Aubrey Plaza, sadly not very good.

by Callum Petch (Twitter: @CallumPetch)

life after beth 2Life After Beth’s first mistake is showing us pretty much nothing prior to Beth’s death.  There is a short little pair of shots of Beth (Aubrey Plaza) on the hike where she dies, but that’s it.  So, straight off the bat, the film faces an uphill battle, as we are dropped into Zach’s (Dane DeHaan) grief with little context besides the fact that they were boyfriend and girlfriend.  Emphasis on “were” as the two had broken up with each other in the week leading up to her death.  It’s unclear as to whether this was Zach or Beth’s doing, as well, and at no point do we get an indication of their relationship prior to the events of the film outside of said break-up, and you can probably already tell the issue here.

In any case, about a week after her death, Beth rises from her grave and returns home to her alternately terrified and overjoyed parents (John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon), who keep her sheltered from the world and her condition sheltered from her for obvious reasons.  Zach, however, still grieving majorly about the whole thing, manages to force his way in and is similarly alternately terrified and overjoyed about his girlfriend being resurrected, especially since the week between the two of them breaking up and her death is conveniently hazy for her.  From there…

Well, here’s the film’s second mistake.  The premise is thin, but you can stretch it out to a 90 minute film if you work hard enough on that one bit.  Life After Beth, however, is like a magpie; it keeps getting distracted by different shiny objects and only really returns to that original idea, what should be the emotional centre of this whole crazy mess, when it looks back over at it and remembers how shiny it is.  The film also wants you to invest in Zach’s cartoonishly uncaring and one-note family, to find Beth’s dad, Maury, overly sheltering and a threat to the couple’s happiness, to also root for Zach to drop Beth and get with a just-returned childhood friend, Erica (Anna Kendrick), and to be sufficiently intrigued and worried by the fact that Beth doesn’t seem to be the only one returning from the dead to not care when that subplot hijacks the majority of the film’s last half-hour.

It’s a very confused film, and writer/director Jeff Baena’s script and direction do little to paper up those cracks.  There seems to be no real thematic through line, because the film keeps shifting focus and ideas every few minutes, so it has a slightly hypocritical bent to some parts of it – you gain no prizes for figuring out that Maury is both kinda right in sheltering Beth and that the film painting him as a villain for doing so, when the rather obsessive Zach wants her all for himself but is a hero for that, feels more than a bit selective in the morality sense.  The film seems like it’s painting Beth’s return as a second chance for Zach, as some kind of chance to right some kind of wrong he committed the first time, but that feels weird seeing as we have no idea what he may or may not have done wrong the first time, and it all gets lost in the shuffle as the film goes on and becomes more and more overcrowded.

The theme problem then gets exacerbated by the poorly developed characters.  Nobody here feels like a real believable person for various reasons.  Either they awkwardly flip-flop based on what the current scene is telling them to be (Zach), or they’re still a draft or two away from doing or being what they keep being teased to be (Maury), or they’re so cartoonishly one-dimensional and try-too-hard-to-be-quirky as to be annoying instead of entertaining (Zach’s older brother Kyle, who is a paranoid, abusive, gun-nut security officer), or they’re pointless (Erica) or wasted (Beth’s mum, Geenie), or they’re Beth herself.

Beth isn’t really a character so much as just the thing whose existence the film revolves around.  She doesn’t have any real consistency, flitting wildly between scenes, she doesn’t have much in the way of a personality, and that lack of pre-death time means there’s no baseline to measure the dead-alive Beth against.  She’s a weird blank slate that gets re-arranged into whatever the film needs her to be at whatever time, and any impression she makes is down to the always likeable Aubrey Plaza instead of herself.  And, yes, there is the weird uncomfortableness that stems from her becoming more zombie-like the angrier and, for lack of a better term, bitchier she gets.

Then there’s the issue that this comedy is lacking in laughs.  It’s not completely without them, especially when it lets Aubrey Plaza go full-zombie near its end game, but it is weirdly lacking in actual jokes.  The scenes where laughs are supposed to come kind of just ramble with no real construction until you eventually laugh at something, although I’ll be damned if I figured out what said laugh was supposed to be about 80% of the time.  Otherwise, a lot of the film is played weirdly straight but also kinda isn’t?  There are a lot of scenes that are supposed to be played for some kind of emotional resonance, but the film keeps undercutting them with its desire to be off-beat, and I found that rather distracting.  It’s especially bad during what is supposed to be the film’s big emotional climax, where whatever power a scene lacking in pre-film context could have had is immediately set on fire by having a ridiculous piece of physical comedy occur seconds after its crescendo.  It’s jarring, and not in a good way, the definite mark of a first-time director who hasn’t figured out how to juggle disparate tones yet.

None of this is to say that Life After Beth is without merit.  After all, I laughed occasionally, I was never bored, and its cast is game.  John C. Reilly is madly trying to fill in the blanks in his character, Molly Shannon is asked to Molly Shannon for 90-odd minutes and she’s more than happy to do that, Anna Kendrick literally walks into the film for about two or three scenes and is adorably charmingly amazing as per usual (yes, I have my biases, at least I admit them), whilst Aubrey Plaza is strangely withheld from large sections of the runtime but she attempts to make the most of them when she gets the chance, and I will cop to finding her full-zombie really funny.  Dane DeHaan, meanwhile, continues his post-Chronicle career path of wasting his considerable talents on films that don’t deserve them, managing to keep Zach a consistent and interesting character whilst the film is running and visibly straining to make the more dramatic scenes work.

Life After Beth, then, is a failure, but it is an interesting failure.  It’s the kind of failure where one can see where the potential for a very good and maybe even great film is located, but can also see it, in real time no less, squander said potential due to a bunch of mistakes that could have easily been sorted out.  It all comes back to that script, which is at least five-or-so drafts away from tapping that potential but, as is, is an unfocussed and rather unfinished mess.  There’s a really talented cast desperately trying to raise the material on display, but they just end up being wasted.  I was never bored, I was even fitfully entertained, but I was severely disappointed and ultimately unfulfilled.

Callum Petch’s style is wild, and you know that it still is.  Follow him on the Twitters (@CallumPetch)!

For an alternative view on Life After Beth from the Failed Critics team, you can also check out Mike’s FrightFest round-up and Carole’s views on the podcast.

Failed Critics Podcast: BO(JCVD)GOF

marvellousWelcome all to this weeks podcast This episode has a bumper crop of new releases.. and new-ish releases..! A whopping four films out in the cinema right now receive the Failed Critics treatment. Whilst Carole reviews the latest Woody Allen movie Magic in the Moonlight and the upcoming zom-rom-com Life After Beth, Owen tackles the recent Liam Neeson crime thriller A Walk Among The Tombstones and the totes ruddy spiffing The Riot Club.

Amongst all that, the team also found time to talk about BBC’s latest Storyville season, the 1989 black comedy The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, and Steve even got in on the new-releases by reviewing the Toby Jones drama, Marvellous, shown on TV this week (and therefore still on iPlayer).

AND, if all that wasn’t enough, as a result of Owen’s quiz triumph last week, Carole & Steve’s forfeit was to watch the Jean-Claude Van Damme classic Double Impact, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme alongside Jean-Claude Van Damme. Yes, that’s right! Two Van Damme’s for the price of one.

Join us next week for reviews of Denzel Washington’s new thriller, The Equalizer.

LISTEN VIA ACAST FOR THE MOST INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE

DIRECT DOWNLOAD LINK

FrightFest 2014 Diary – The Heart of Dark Comedy

By Mike Shawcross (@Shawky1969)

zombeaversOver the years at FrightFest I’ve always looked out for the comedies which play the festival. The very first film I saw was Black Sheep, a New Zealand horror comedy about zombified sheep hell bent on eating people. Watching it with that audience, it was hilarious, laughter is infectious at the festival and I got swept along with it. I’ve since revisited the film and it’s just isn’t that funny, or as funny as I remember it that night.

So, what did this year’s festival have in store for me? Well Dead Snow 2, Zombeavers, WolfCop and Life after Beth were the four I had planned to see. However, Dead Snow 2 was playing the horror main screen while WolfCop was in the discovery screen. A bad clash to say the least! The only way around this problem was to buy a ticket for the earlier screening of Dead Snow in the Arrow screen. Next, I just had to make sure I got myself a Discovery ticket for WolfCop, else I’d be watching Dead Snow 2 again or going to the Phoenix for a drink; I got a ticket.

Opening night and Zombeavers gets the midnight slot, playing to an almost full house; a few always disappear to the Phoenix or need to get the last tube or bus home, but this is an impressive turnout.

Zombeavers, very much like Black Sheep, plays on the animals of choice, becoming infected by some man made toxic waste – isn’t that nearly always the case? This bright green goo, having an adverse effect on the local beaver colony, makes flesh and bone much more appetising than gnawing on a lump of wood now. Introduce the food, a group of attractive college girls (of course) staying at a relative’s cabin by the lake. One’s trying to get over her cheating boyfriend, the others are there to keep her company. Obviously the boyfriends turn up at some point, just to add to the expected body count and group tension; the cheating boyfriend, who hates who and the one who would ditch the others in a beaver attack to save themselves. The typical old couple living next door, a hunter who you wouldn’t trust as far as you could throw him and of course don’t forget the dog; there is always a dog. Actually the hunter and the dog gag are a couple of the best things in the whole thing.

Jordan Rubin, directing his first feature, doesn’t do anything wrong really, it’s just by-the-numbers. He plays on all the same beats every other crazy, zombified animal vs humans film has used before. The cast are all relatively unknown (well, unknown to me) although I did recognise Rex Lin (CSI Miami) as the hunter and as I said before, he’s the best thing in it. Using animatronics, which on the whole are very good, gave the film some old school charm and definitely beats a colony of psychotic CGI beaver’s any day.

Now, I don’t mind these films on the whole, but the visual gags have nearly all been covered now. It needs strong writing and decent acting to make it stand out from all the other crazy killer animal films already out there. While there are some funny moments, they are mostly visual as the script and the acting were rather flat. It just didn’t stand out from the crowd in the end, which was a shame because I really wanted to like this film.

Dead Snow 2: Red Vs Dead was one of my most anticipated films at this year’s festival. Twitter was full of positive comments before FrightFest and being a big fan of the original I was extremely excited to see this.

Martin’s nightmare continues; he thinks he’s survived, that he’s escaped the Nazi zombies with only losing his arm (a small price to pay after the carnage he’s witnessed). But, it’s not over, not yet. He still has one gold coin and Herzog wants it back. In the fight for the coin, Herzog loses his arm but recovers the gold. Martin awakes next day in hospital with a new arm… Herzog’s arm! Found in the car, the doctors assumed it was his and attached it instead. Meanwhile, Herzog has remembered his original mission and now he’s going to complete it; plus he as a new arm, Martin’s arm. The local police are on Martin’s case as well and they plan to catch him before the big city cops arrive on the scene and get the glory. Martin knows Herzog’s plan through the arm’s connection to its former host. Armed with his new zombie arm and the zombie squad from America, he sets out to defeat Herzog and his army of zombies.

dead snow 2

Tommy Wirkola returns to his original Dead Snow and continues the story from literally the last frame of the first film. He takes everything he did in the first and makes it bigger and better in every way possible. Escaping the confines of the snow bound cabin, Wirkola really lets loose with the scope of the sequel. Now his zombie army are taking down towns and slaying everybody that gets in their way. It’s bolder in content, with more gore, blood and some “really did they just do that” moments that I just couldn’t stop laughing at. From start to finish I laughed and so did the Arrow screen. The FrightFest crowd I saw it with were laughing, cheering and clapping. Horror comedy at its best!

Vegar Hoel returns as Martin and carries the film easily, he is simply brilliant. Orjan Gamst is great back in the role of Herzog. While Daniel, Monica and Blake are played by Martin Starr (Adventureland), Jocelyn DeBoer and Ingrid Hass (Scott Pilgrim vs The World) and form the Zombie Squad. Stig Frode Henriksen is Glenn the tour guide who has some great lines and Derek Mears as Stavarin, the action police officer who knows nothing, and Amrita Acharia as Reidun, the cop that does know everything. They are all great characters and drive the story along backed by the strong script, super visuals and a great sense of fun.

For once my expectations were rewarded. Here was a sequel which was better in every way than its predecessor. My comedy of the festival without doubt and my second favourite film all weekend.

WolfCop was another film with a big social media following. How could this fail to be entertaining and, more than that, funny? I mean he’s a werewolf and a cop, the jokes should write themselves.

Lou Garou is a local police officer with a drink problem, a major drink problem usually resulting in a complete blackout of the previous night’s events. Yet his problems are about to get a whole lot worse, a lot bloodier and hairier than he could ever imagine. Cursed, he now becomes a werewolf, blacking out after each transformation. Lou’s memory is fuzzy and he blames the drink. Yet as the vicious attacks continue and the bodies mount up, all the clues point towards Lou being the culprit. With the help of his friend, Willie, he sets out to solve the case, but Tina, another police officer, is already one step ahead. She confronts Lou, but there are darker forces at work and Lou soon realises that he’s going to need the wolf to solve this case and beat the evil in his town.

Leo Fafard as Lou gives a solid performance as the “I couldn’t give a shit” drunken cop, and his transformation into a person who could give a shit is well handled. Amy Matysio is the standout cop, Tina, and she gives a good performance, if a little underused. The rest of the cast are all fine; Jonathen Cherry as Willie has the majority of the best lines throughout the film. The direction by Lowell Dean (13 Eerie) is solid, though it’s the writing which I felt was the weakest aspect of the film. It’s not bad and does have its moments, it just seemed a little flat. The action is very well handled and the werewolf attacks were gory and extremely bloody. The look of the werewolf was along the lines of The Wolfman, allowing him to wear the cop uniform and obviously be able to talk and of course have sex! One of the funnier scenes (or not, depending on your taste). Of course, being a wolf, he needs a car to reflect his ferocious animal nature; time to pimp the police car.

I really wanted to like WolfCop, I had bent over backwards to see it. I did like quite a bit of it really, but I just couldn’t figure out its tone and I’m still struggling to find it now. Either it was a little more serious than I expected or I just didn’t find it that funny, I’m not sure which. Alhough I remember some laughter, it wasn’t in the same league as Dead Snow 2, which I think that was what I was expecting. Yet, while not finding it that funny, it’s still a solid b-movie and worth having a look at. You may just find it a lot funnier than I did.life after beth

Life After Beth wasn’t a film I had noticed on my first look through Saturday’s schedule. With no competition in the Discovery screen, it picked itself and I left it at that.

Zach is missing his recently deceased girlfriend, Beth. He’s even taken to playing chess with her dad, Maury, and wearing Beth’s scarf in the middle of summer. Then one day, he thinks he sees Beth. He’s convinced it’s her and tries to prove he’s not seeing things. Beth is alive! Well, sort of. Her parents are keeping her housebound, but Zach wants to see her, rekindle their relationship and go hiking. But she’s turning more zombie every day and soon she wants to start eating people, even Zach.

Zach, played by Dane DeHaan (Chronicle, The Amazing Spider-Man 2) and Aubrey Plaza (Safety Not Guaranteed, Parks & Recreation) as Beth are both superb. There is a strong connection between them which comes through in their performance and the writing which takes you on an emotional rollercoaster. From the quite depressing lows to the extremely funny highs, it’s a great ride and one I was sorry to see end. The rest of the cast are all extremely good as well; Molly Shannon and John C. Reilly as Beth’s parents; Paul Riser and Cheryl Hines as Zach’s parents; and a great performance from Matthew Gray Gubler as Zach’s older brother Kyle.

Life After Beth is written by Jeff Baena – it is also his directional debut and it’s a pretty impressive one at that. Some of the visual gags are superb and extremely funny, especially one particular scene with a cooker which was hilarious.

Boasting a strong cast, backed with a great script, this was a joy to watch and ranked third in my best of FrightFest list, behind Dead Snow 2 and The House At The End Of Time. I do believe it is scheduled for a cinema release soon. It’s one I would recommend seeing wholeheartedly. I’ll be going back to see it!

You can check out what else Mike has seen at this year’s FrightFest here, including Truth or Dare, The Guest and more!

FrightFest 2014 Diary – Part 2: What was seen and worth seeing

By Mike Shawcross (@Shawky1969)

Cast and Crew of The CanelFor me, this was a quality year. However, I get the impression I actually missed the poorer films either by good discovery screen choices, buying extra main screen tickets or by doing something else; like interviewing Jessica Cameron and Ryan Kiser for their film Truth or Dare [keep an eye out for that interview and review on the site soon]. Or you could just get caught up with talking all things Sinister and its sequel with the writer of the film, C. Robert Cargill. In past years for me it was always about the films. This year, I really wasn’t bothered if I missed the odd one here and there. I even skipped Sin City: A Dame to Kill For to go and see The Congress at Cineworld as it wasn’t showing in Manchester; and after seeing Sin City 2 last night, I was glad I did!

I’m not glazing over the films here – and we do intend to post more detailed reviews over the coming days – there are just far too many films to cover and do them and the festival justice.

The Guest was a superb opening film, one I thoroughly enjoyed. Possibly one of the best opening films I’ve seen. The closing film, The Signal, was one I wasn’t really feeling and instead went to the Phoenix bar for the party. General consensus was while it was a good film, it shouldn’t have closed the festival.

I do like a good horror comedy as they usually work very well with this audience: Zombeavers, WolfCop, Dead Snow 2 and Life After Beth. Both Zombeavers and WolfCop had their share of funny moments, but I felt both were just not funny enough. In fact, I was really quite disappointed with WolfCop in the end. Dead Snow 2 however was the funniest thing I saw. Packed with laugh out moments, this was when the festival vibe got me. The Arrow screen audience responded superbly to the film with big laughs, cheers and applause; that’s the Frightfest way! This was my 2nd favourite film of the weekend. Life After Beth had a superb cast was extremely well written and very funny at times, another festival favourite of mine.

Werewolves seemed to be one of the themes this year, with Late Phases, WolfCop and Blood Moon. I missed Blood Moon and never really heard too much about it, while Late Phases I saw and really enjoyed this. A blind vet takes on a werewolf to revenge the death of his dog – brilliant fun!

Honeymoon was a decent start to Friday. Rose Leslie and Harry Treadaway carried the film quite well. Julia was a rape/revenge film taking its inspiration from Asian revenge films with overtones of Drive thrown in as well. Great soundtrack for this one, and one I liked very much. The Canal, another strong film, follows Rupert Evans as his character’s life and mind start to fall apart after his wife goes missing. Calum Heath, who plays Evan’s son, was superb.

Another disappoint for me was The Babadook. While Essie Davis gives possibly the finest female performance of the festival, the film wasn’t what I was expecting. I didn’t get “this year’s Sinister“, which is what it’s marketed like; actually it’s much more like The Canal. I really need to see it again.

Films I would have liked to have seen but ended up missing were Digging up the Marrow, Housebound, Deadly Virtues, Blood Moon, and The Drownsman, though I’ve not seen or heard anyone talk about that one. There was also R100 (which is actually repeated on Film4 on the 3rd September), Exists and Bad Milo. I know it sounds wrong to some but many people really enjoyed the musical Stage Fright; I do like musicals!

Truth or Dare was the nastiest piece of work I saw and I fully enjoyed it for that reason. Jessica Cameron is one sick woman! However, she popped my interview cherry and I thank her for that; a superb guest all weekend; so full of energy and all things horror! I get the impression she really enjoyed FrightFest!

Starry Eyes felt like a disappointment after it ended but it’s gotten better the more I think about it – not much, but it was good. The Harvest had a tremendous cast in Shannon, Morton and Fonda, Morton was brilliant, another of my favourites. Among the Living was one I was looking forward to and one which didn’t disappoint me. It had touches of Spielberg and King but with a French horror twist and a decent score.

Open Windows and Faults were big surprises for me, especially Faults. A dark comedy with Leland Orser and Mary Elizabeth Winstead in top form , as Orser tries to save Winstead from the cult ‘Faults’ which has her in its grip, another strong film. Open Windows, whilst a lot of fun, possibly may not hold up to repeat viewings. But Elijah Wood continues to make interesting film choices and Sasha Grey does a decent job in this one.

Now before my number 1 film, another that I had high hopes for was V/H/S: Viral. While better than V/H/S, it wasn’t as good as the sequel. My main problem was the wrap around story which didn’t seem to link the main films or have any connection with them at all. Plus, it was near enough impossible to work out was going on. The 3 main segments I did like, but in the end it could have just been a Creepshow film. I should have just seen the short film Showcase instead!

My favourite film of the weekend was The House at the End of Time, a horror film from Venezuela – the first one – and wow! What a film; and one of the jumpiest films at the festival! From the cast, which includes Ruddy Rodriguez (a former Miss Venezuela) to the kids who were both very good, to the sound design (which was incredible) and the very well told, very clever story. Outstanding!

The Duke Mitchell film club brought along a film, Coherence, which many people really enjoyed and one I will be looking out for. They also did a Film Party after it, where many of the guest directors, producers and even actors brought a little something to share with the crowd. For 90 minutes we got terrible music videos, trailers, shorts and party games. It was superb, very funny and a great break from all the films. They hope to repeat it next year and I for one will be going.

One last mention has to go the fans. They are brilliant. Some keep themselves to themselves but you could just start talking to anyone and you could end up in a conversation for hours. I’d often go for the drinks and they would have to come and find me, because I got talking to someone at the bar, sometimes I didn’t even make the bar!

The after festival party was at the phoenix where the plan was to leave at 3am it was 5.05 am when we eventually walked home, maybe a little drunk; but still on a high having experienced my favourite FrightFest in 8 years! I will be back next year!

Coming up next at some point this week will be our interview with Truth or Dare director Jessica Cameron and star Ryan Kiser. We’ll also take a more in depth look at some of our favourite films from FrightFest. Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, All Cheerleaders Die and The Den reviews are already live on the site!

Frightfest 2014 Preview Part 2: Change and sleepy queues

By Mike Shawcross (@shawky1969)

FrightfestSaturday usually boasts a strong line up and this year, it’s got some decent looking films and even a Party! Films in the main programme during the day include All Cheerleaders Die, Starry Eyes and Dead Within.

All Cheerleaders Die is from the director Lucky McKee (The Woman) and Chris Siverston (The Lost). An All the Boys Love Mandy Lane and The Craft mash up, it sounds quite a bit of fun and one I’m disappointed to be missing; though it has a DVD release in September.  Starry Eyes is a film from directors Kevin Kolsch & Dennis Widmyer and starring relative newcomer Alex Essose. A story of selling your soul for your dreams, as a desperate actress will do anything for her major break in Hollywood. Yet another one that sounds worth a watch. The Harvest starring Michael Shannon, Peter Fonda and Samantha Morton and directed by John McNaughton sounds a very strong film indeed. Boasting a solid cast and a something in the basement premise this really does sound worth seeing. I may have to rethink my Discovery Screen choice for this one.

In the discovery screen and playing against The Harvest for me is Dead Within; from director Ben Wagner. A couple struggle to stay alive in a remote cabin in the woods after surviving a pandemic; not only fighting the dangers from outside they soon have to fight their own paranoia from within. Not high on my watch list; over in the other Discovery screen is Bad Milo, a film I was up for seeing but may change my mind! Directed by Jacob Vaughan and starring Ken Marino (We’re the Millers) about a bloodthirsty creature living in the lower intestine of Duncan (Marino) and emerging from his rectum to eat anyone that is annoying Duncan. Sounds bizarre and ridiculous and just the sort of Discovery film that will generate a lot of buzz! I think I may watch The Harvest.

Next in the Discovery Screens are White Settlers and The Short Films (Part 1). Over the years I’ve come to enjoy the short film showcase usually sponsored by the Horror Channel; some have been exceptional, but this year it is tucked away in the Discovery screen and I will be giving it a miss. White Settlers directed by Simeon Halligan (Splintered) and starring Pollyanna McIntosh (The Woman) set in the Scottish Borders as a young couple move into a remote farmhouse and are terrorized by a group of masked intruders. Sounds a typical house invasion film, but I’m hoping for something different. I know Simeon; he runs the Grimm Fest film festival in Manchester so I’ll be supporting this film anyway.

Mitch Jenkins directs an Alan Moore penned film; Show Pieces in the Discovery screen 1. A trilogy of stories written directly for the screen by Moore and which sounds fun; I like anthology films, and I do like most of Moore’s adaptations so I’ll be seeing this one.

Saturday evening’s main films are Life After Beth, directed by Jeff Baena in his debut feature and with a stunning cast; Aubrey Plaza, Dane DeHaan, John C Reilly, Anna Kendrick and Molly Shannon.  A zombie rom-com with a twist it sounds a blast and I will be not be missing this one. The Babadook is one which has already gained quite a bit of buzz on twitter this year, and a film I’m looking forward to seeing. Directed by Jennifer Kent in her first film and starring Essie Davis (The Matrix sequels), Daniel Henshall (Snowtown) and Noah Wiseman. The story of a widow looking after her son while his fear grows that there is a monster in the house, she starts to feel a sinister presence around her.

Sin City: A Dame To Kill For needs no introduction or build-up; this is the biggest film at the festival this year. The original Sin City was a festival favourite and I’m sure the sequel will play very well; but it’s actually a film I’ll be missing. It opens nationwide a week later plus it’s playing in the midnight slot for the Horror screen so I’m off to a Frightfest party instead. (NB – This has now moved to the opening night)

In the evening discovery screen 1 we have a TBC, Digging up the Marrow and Creep. Digging up the Marrow is a film of two halves. Literally. Opening as a documentary exploring Monster Art it then becomes a horror film as the documentary makers investigate a so called “real” monster. Sounds quite appealing and I do like Adam Greens films, but against The Babadook it has no chance. Creep directed by and starring Patrick Brice alongside Mark Duplass in this improvised film. Taken from a 10 page outline, Duplass and Brice make it up as they go along. I’ll be at the party!

In the Discovery Screen 2 there is The Mirror, a UK production from director Edward Boase and starring Jemma Dallender (I Spit On Your Grave). Based on a so called true story of a haunted mirror reported by the Daily Mail and Huffington Post, I think I’ll be waiting for the DVD.

The following two events in the discovery screen are from the Duke Mitchell film club. Coherence directed by James Ward Byrkit is showing first followed by a Film Party in the final showing of the day. Both events should be worth a visit, though I’ll be attending the Party over the film.

The Sunday line up in the main screen looks very good and I’m only straying into the Discovery Screen for House at the End of Time in the evening session. Discovery screen 2 is showing some retro films for the day, they include The Visitor from 1979 and directed by Giulio Paradisi.  A Nightmare on Elm Street, Robert Englund is in attendance at the festival. Nekromantik from 1988 directed by Jorg Buttgereit and The Shining from 1980, directed by Stanley Kubrick. The final film of the day is a new film; Another from director Jason Bognacki. Sounding like a giallo/hammer hybrid I think I’ll stay in the main screen.

Open Windows directed by Nacho Vigalondo and starring Elijah Wood, Neil Maskell and Sasha Grey; who all have had previous films play at the festival before, comes this new cyber horror film. One I wasn’t interested in until I read the synopsis. Worth a look. In the Discovery screen 1 there is  Expedition; while it sounds good, I’m not sure I want to watch a dinosaur found footage film.

Faults starring Mary Elizabeth Winstead (The Thing prequel) and directed by Riley Stearns, his first feature looks an interesting look into the effects that a cult can have on people and their families; really looking forward to this one. In Discovery Screen 1 there is the documentary Drew: The Man Behind the Poster, a look at the life and art of Drew Struzan, it does sound a decent documentary and one I’ll pick up on DVD.

Among the Living from the directors of Livid and Inside; Julien Maury & Alexandre Bustillo and starring Beatrice Dalle comes this coming of age horror film. I am looking forward to this one. Playing alongside this is Doc of the Dead, another documentary about surviving a zombie apocalypse; I’m not really a zombie fan so I’ll stay in the main screen.

The Samurai, a German film and one I really know nothing about. I was hoping to jump into the discovery screen but they don’t really interest me. The Shining, and Lost Soul. So I’ll stick with The Samurai – it might surprise me. Lost Soul is another documentary and doesn’t really draw me in, though it gets good feedback, but may be another I’ll pick up on DVD.

The House at the End of Time, is a debut film written and directed by Alejandro Hidalgo. The first horror film from Venezuela to be shown internationally, this sounds a promising feature; a much better option than Stage Fright in the main screen or Another. Stage Fright, directed by Jerome Sable and starring Minnie Driver and Meatloaf is a musical, a mix of Friday the 13th and Glee, and while that sounds a strange mash-up, it’s not one that’s caught my imagination.

The final film of the day is Home. There is nothing playing against this film. From the director of The Pact, Nicolas McCarthy, Home stars Catalina Sandino Moreno in a story of demonic horror. I prefer the new title of At the Devil’s Door. Sounds a good end to Sunday.

The final day is a mix of main screen, discovery films and tiredness and of course the after festival drinks at the Phoenix Club.

Alleluia, directed by Fabrice du Welz and starring Lola Duenas and Laurent Lucas. The 2nd film in the Ardennes trilogy, the first film being Calvaire. Worth a watch if the first one arrives in time from Amazon! In the discovery 1 there is Altergiest from director Tedi Sarafian, writer of Terminator 3, which put me off a little. This horror/sci-fi thriller is Sarafian’s directional debut and is based on true events, which put me off again. Deadly Virtues from director Ate De Jong, sounds a run of the mill home invasion film, though my 2nd option if I’ve not seen Calvaire before the festival.

Nymph has me in 2 minds; a killer Siren, a Nazi concentration camp and featuring Franco Nero (Django) this doesn’t sounds too bad. Directed by Milan Todorovic and starring Kristina Klebe, I might change my mind. At the moment my plan is to see Lemon Tree Passage in Discovery 1. An Australian urban legend and directed by David Campbell. We’ve been here before with a group of non-believers wanting to disprove the legend, and of course things are never what they seem. Blood Moon from Jeremy Wooding, who directed The Magnificent Eleven (which was alright!) comes this werewolf western starring Shaun Dooley.

Xmoor directed by Luke Hyams and starring Melia Kreiling and Nick Blood comes this UK creature feature. One I’ll be avoiding. The Jessica Cameron Truth or Dare which she co-wrote, directed and stars in alongside Ryan Kiser and Heather Dorff, is my draw in Discovery 1. The film has had a fantastic run on the festival circuit and one I’m looking forward to seeing. Extraterrestrial sounds excellent, from director Nacho Vigalondo, who gave us Timecrimes (which was also excellent) comes this sci-fi romantic comedy. This is one I’m gutted to be missing.

VHS Viral, the 3rd outing in the VHS franchise and one I’m really looking forward to watching, after really enjoying VHS 2 and not really liking most of VHS 1, this one boasts a decent line up of directors including Nacho Vigalondo, Gregg Bishop and Marcel Sarmiento; could be a highlight of the festival. The Remaining plays in Discovery 1, directed by Casey La Scala is a religious-slanted horror film. Playing on the biblical end of the world scenario it’s one I’ll be avoiding. In Discovery screen 2 the 2nd part of the Shorts will be shown, with one short, The Tour starring Jessica Cameron and Heather Dorff, a real coup for Frightfest’s own Damon Rickard in his first short.

The final film of the festival is The Signal, starring Breton Thwaites (Oculus), Olivia Cooke and Laurence Fishburne. Directed and co-written by William Eubank this sounds an interesting film to end on and one I’m looking forward too.

Following the final film will be drinks in the Phoenix bar, where Mike Shawcross will be attending to celebrate and dissect what has been and gone over the previous 5 days – and of course have a well-earned pint or two!

FrightFest will be running from 21-25 August 2014. You can keep up to date with Mike’s reactions here, on our Twitter page (@FailedCritics) or by following him at @Shawky1969