Tag Archives: Richard Attenborough

I’m All Right Jack

Described as a rip-roaring and thought provoking satire, poking fun at the then-burning issue of industrial relations, I’m All Right Jack is as funny today as it has ever been thanks to the amazing restoration work from the team at Studio Canal.

by Owen Hughes (@ohughes86)

OPTBD2804_2Dpack_ImAllRightJackI’m All Right Jack is a classic British comedy film from 1959 by John and Roy Boulting, otherwise known as the Boulting brothers. Identical twins with their own production company, Charter Film Productions, John and Roy used to take it in turns with one directing and the other producing their movies. Although Roy was the most prolific at directing movies, it’s arguably John who is responsible for their most celebrated films. Brighton Rock (1947), Private’s Progress (1956) and indeed I’m All Right Jack were all directed by John.

An adaptation of an Alan Hackney novel, Private Life, Hackney would jointly adapt his book to the silver screen with noted writer and playwright Frank Harvey penning the screenplay. As well as his collaborations with the Boulting’s, he also wrote the script for the 1950’s remake of The 39 Steps. But it was for his work on I’m All Right Jack that he deservedly won his first BAFTA.

Released originally in 1959, it was the highest grossing film at the UK box office that year. It’s no surprise really, it has an extraordinary cast of British talent from the era. Names like Terry-Thomas, Richard Attenborough, Margaret Rutherford, Dennis Price, John Le Mesurier, all names that would’ve drawn audiences to the cinema. That is without even mentioning Peter Sellers, who, believe it or not, though known to many for his work on the Goon Show and other bits and bobs, was not a star like the others. It was his role as Fred Kite, the tragic-comic union leader, that won him his first BAFTA and shot him to national fame. Undeniably, he’s the best thing in it, as he was with most of his films. His comic timing is just masterful. Liz Fraser, playing his daughter and colleague at the Missiles factory (in her first film role) was nominated for a best newcomer BAFTA that same year.

The main character, upon whom the narrative is based, is Stanley Windrush, played by a charming, debonair yet naively innocent Ian Carmichael. From a well-to-do aristocratic background, he ends up being convinced to join the unskilled workforce at his uncle Bertram’s (Dennis Price) factory in order to make a living after returning from the war. Unfortunately for him, he doesn’t quite understand the politics of the playground, so to speak! After being used in a political cat and mouse game between the trade union and his uncle, the film satirises both sides of the divide.

You’ve just seen all of the awards it either won or was nominated for, and it genuinely deserved each of them. Sometimes with these old comedies, they can be a bit stale or stuffy compared to modern films which seem oh so much more sophisticated. But when you get down to it, I’m All Right Jack is actually a really well written and hilariously performed story. Yes it’s a bit hokey by today’s standards, some of the gags are very slapstick and the “wrap-around” story at the nudist colony is on the naff side of cheeky. However, the script is sharp and biting; it examines the greed and self-serving nature of those in charge as well as the flippant cloudy reasonings of some unionists, all whilst managing to amuse and remain playful. Its ultimate aim seems to be to take down both sides, and I think it does exactly that.

If you enjoy classic British comedies such as Kind Hearts & Coronets or Passport to Pimlico, then I’m sure you will enjoy this too.

I’m Alright Jack is released on digitally restored Blu-ray and DVD on 19 January. Extras include an informative and entertaining brand new Interview with Liz Fraser, a Cinefile: Seller’s Best segment and the rather surreal and goofy Academy Award nominated short The Running, Jumping & Standing Still Film, starring Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan and Richard Lester.

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Failed Critics Podcast: The Battle of the Four Critics

get santaWelcome one and all to a very merry penultimate edition of the Failed Critics Podcast 2014! We took a couple of weeks off in a bid to resolve our audio issues, but have returned just in time for Christmas. Joining stalwarts Owen and Steve are our special guests Matt Lambourne and Callum Petch.

Foregoing any news this week, mainly in an effort to keep spirits high, we kick off the festivities with a twist on the regular quiz theme. The team run through which Christmas movies they’ve been watching on the run up to the big day and there’s even time to squeeze in a review of the most anticipated December blockbuster The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, Peter Jackson’s final journey into Middle Earth.

We’ve even brought you an early triple bill shaped present for such a joyous occasion as this. Steve, Owen, Matt and Calum pick their three favourite films featuring actors who have famously played Santa Claus on the big screen; Tim Allen (The Santa Clause), Richard Attenborough (Miracle on 34th Street), James Cosmo (The Chronicles of Narnia) and Tom Hanks (The Polar Express) respectively.

Join us next week for the end of year special as we reveal the winners (and losers) of the Failed Critics Awards 2014!

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The Week In Film – 29 August 2014: From Dickie Attenborough to Martin Scorsese

Welcome… to the Week In Film! No Steve this week as he was too busy trying to edit the latest Failed Critics Podcast into something that resembled coherent chat. Instead, stepping in at the last minute is Owen Hughes, rounding up what’s been happening in the world of film.

by Owen Hughes (@ohughes86)

Richard AttenboroughRichard Attenborough: A Tribute

Sad news to start us off this week as BAFTA, Golden Globe and Oscar winning actor/director Richard Attenborough passed away. Whether he was breaking out of POW camps in The Great Escape or saving Christmas in Miracle on 34th Street, his roles have become synonymous with iconic cinema. His delivery of lines was second to none and he’ll go down as a true legend.

He has been the star of many of the Failed Critics’ favourite films too, from 1947’s British gangster classic Brighton Rock to Spielberg’s dinosaur epic adventure movie Jurassic Park.

For that, we’d like to thank him for brightening up our lives 90-120 minutes at a time.

Another successful FrightFest

Onto more light-hearted news now as Monday saw the close of the 15th annual FrightFest held at the Vue cinema in the West End. A total of 64 films were screened over the extended weekend’s festival of all things horror.

No matter how big or small the budget, it is as much of a chance for indie film makers like Jessica Cameron [whose interview with us will be on the site soon] as it is for Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller to get their film seen by die hard fans. From Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, to Bad Milo! (a film about a monster that lives inside a man’s arse) the range of films on show catered for every kind of fan and the vast majority left FrightFest satisfied.

This year we even had our own inside man, Mike Shawcross. You can check out his opinion on the festival from the venue changes to the films screened.

Hanks, Howard and popular literature

Following news last week that Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg will be unexpectedly reuniting to make a new film so shortly after it was assumed their Cornetto trilogy had been completed, this week we learned that Ron Howard and Tom Hanks will be getting together again.

They will be combining once more to adapt another Dan Brown crime-mystery novel, Inferno. Whilst on paper the plot sounds interesting, like a mix between the Liam Neeson thriller Unknown and the recent Channel 4 series Utopia, expectations are low.

Both The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons were massively popular mystery novels yet the films drew little critical praise, despite Da Vinci Code earning huge amounts in the box office. A bit like the books themselves, they were both very popular with their readers, but panned by critics.ashecliffe

Shutter Island: Ashecliffe

Martin Scorsese’s psychological thriller from 2010, Shutter Island, is set to be made into a TV series. Set in 1954, the film saw a US Marshall investigate a missing persons case at a home for the criminally insane as his own sanity is called into question.

Few solid details about the show have been confirmed, save for the fact that the title will be Ashecliffe, the name of the hospital, and that Scorsese will direct the pilot episode and Dennis Lehane will pen it. With Fargo‘s recent translation from the silver screen to the LED one, it seems a trend may be developing.

Next week, Steve will return to give us another round up of the latest in film news. 

A Decade In Film: The Eighties – 1982

A continuing series where Failed Critics contributors look back on a particular decade in the world of cinema and choose their favourite films from each year of that decade. Matt Lambourne has lucked out with arguably the most entertaining, balls-to-the-wall decade of all. This week he takes us through his choices for 1982.

5. Space Adventure Cobra

spaceactioncobra“So, are you taking any bets on how this is going to end?”

Space Adventure Cobra is perhaps the oldest in a line of 80’s/90’s Anime that adorned my Video shelf as a teenager. Being released only a few years after the original Star Wars, it steals from the source material incessantly even beginning with a large Starship flyover, however it is far from a film for all the family.

The story follows Cobra, the most wanted man in the galaxy who is on a voyage to protect a beautiful female bounty-hunter whom is being hunted by the evil ‘Space Mafia Guild’. Cobra himself is the happy go lucky, overly confident macho hero who is very much Han Solo crossed with Mega Man, due to the ability to morph his left arm into a powerful Psycho Cannon.

The aesthetics of the movie certainly complement the era it’s trying to imitate, with vivid colour and a Vengelis-esque soundtrack, it may lack the polished animation that later Manga will trademark yet is still so easy on the eye.

Every Star Wars wannabe needs a bad guy and that comes in the form of the seemingly indestructible ‘Lord Necron’, who resembles more Dr. Doom (of the Marvel Universe) or perhaps even the camped up bling-bling diva that is Emperor Xerxes from ‘300’ more than the Sci-Fi baddie archetype Darth Vader.

The film is a charming love-story, brilliant sci-fi and hypnotic psychedelica all crammed into the right running time for easy viewing. The saga continued in a popular anime comic and has spawned a cult following. If a movie has ever paid a better tongue-in-cheek homage to classic sci-fi then I’d very much like to see it! Cobra provides a bite-sized action adventure that defies its age and leaves a lasting legacy that it is ‘Love’ not good, that will conquer all.

4. Tootsie

TootsieI was a better man with you, as a woman… than I ever was with a woman, as a man. You know what I mean?

The 80’s did two types of movies better than any other decade, action movies and great comedies. Tootsie is a delightful example of taking a ridiculous concept, adding a great ensamble cast and making on screen hilarity ensue. The focus of the film is on Michael Dorsey (Dustin Hoffman) an actor who is a notoriously difficult to work with, as he struggles to line up his next big role. He takes matters into the extreme by creating a female counter-part, Dorothy Michaels to enable to find work. However he never banked upon falling in love with the lovely fresh faced Jessica Lange or the number of men who’d fall for his less than classical feminine character!

The cast really makes this movie so watchable. Aside from Lange and Hoffman, you have a typically funny supporting role from the legendary Bill Murray, a creepy TV actor has-been in George Gaynes (better known as Commandant Lassard in Police Academy) and a very early mini role for Geena Davis. Hoffman is quite brilliant as Dorothy, much more so than he is as Michael. His no nonsense approach to his professional and personal life which rendered him so unemployable as a male makes him a prime candidate for a full time soap opera role as powerful leading lady.

This allows him much closer access to Lange’s character who is a single mother being taken advantage of by the show’s creepy producer, she slowly gains a remarkable liking for the mysterious and refreshing hard-nosed approach of Dorothy, wishing she could emulate her. Dorothy begins to spend more time with Lange outside of work and there is a particularly disturbing heart to heart part way through the movie whereby you actually wonder if Lange’s character is falling in love with a transvestite, unbeknownst to her! It’s an awkwardness so convincing that it landed her the Oscar for Best Supporting actress!

It goes without saying that Hoffman really delivers when thrust into extreme roles, such as that he will later take up in Rain Man. This movie really sets a blue print for those that follow in the 90’s such as Mrs. Doubtfire, but even that does not match the innocence and delight of Tootsie, which was 1982’s 2nd highest grossing film behind E.T!

3. First Blood

first-blood-knife-rambo“I could have killed ’em all, I could’ve killed you. In town you’re the law, out here it’s me. Don’t push it! Don’t push it or I’ll give you a war you won’t believe. Let it go. Let it go!”

It’s the movie that defined the action hero archetype. Sylvester Stallone is John Rambo, vagrant Vietnam veteran, passing through a sleepy mountain town that simply does not want him spoiling their idyllic scenery. He crosses the path of Teasle (Brian Dennehy), Sherriff of the town who makes it clear on no uncertain terms that he should leave town immediate and escorts him to the town borders. However when Rambo marches back the wrong way, he is taken into custody having committed no crime.

He eventually escapes into the wilderness and begins a one man guerrilla war against the inept local law enforcement. It likely encouraged a generation of youngsters to enter into their local woods planting booby-traps and getting gimped up in camouflage face-paint, or was that just me and my friends?

Unlike later Stallone action romps, the action here is subtle and realistic; it’s a stealth war against meandering nincompoops. It’s also one of the few movies where Stallone talks fairly eloquently, it would seem he perhaps dumbed himself down for many roles he played later.

Whilst the action is clever and satisfying, it poses a greater moral concern to the American viewing public as to how veterans are perceived upon leaving service, particularly those deployed to Vietnam. It demonstrates a common disregard for soldiers who served in a messy war, something that Hollywood was slow to highlight. Later efforts such as Born on The Forth of July picked up the mantle, though it is arguable that that ‘First Blood’ is more mainstream friendly, thus ramming home the undeniable truth to a wider audience.

The Rambo character does for the action-movie genre what Hoover did for Vacuum cleaners. It became the synonymous figure for the unstoppable one-man army genre that dominated the 80’s. It spawned 3 sequels, non of which live up to the original in my opinion, but First Blood was the movie that established Stallone beyond Rocky and saw his career go supernova!

2. Blade Runner

Blade Runner“I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.”

It was a difficult decision in regards to the positioning of my favourite two movies of 1982, both are worthy of the grandest title of them all. I think you’ll approve of my final choice, however there is much time to discuss the grandeur of my number two choice.

I was fortunate to only see Blade Runner for the first time in my twenties, a good 25 years after its release. I feel much of its subtle appeal and nuances would have passed me by at a younger age. Co-produced by Ridley Scott, Blade Runner is sci-fi indulged on the most epic of scales. From the monumental soundtrack by Vengelis, to its dark and wet Urban backdrops dashed in Neon lighting creating a Future Noir masterpiece. Blade Runner is easily one of the most visually impressive movies ever created.

The film follows Deckard (Harrison Ford) who is a Blade Runner, a group of specialist police assembled to hunt Replicants, which are near perfect human duplications with enhanced strength and tolerance to pain. He is assigned one last case to hunt down 4 recently escaped Replicants and ‘retire them’ before they cause havoc on the LA populous and ultimately meet their maker.

Ford puts in a great performance as the care-free and seemingly nonchalant Deckard, who shows no sympathy for those he is trying to hunt, or those whom his spiteful tongue might disturb, namely that of the seemingly emotionless Rachel (Sean Young) who is introduced to Deckard as test subject for Replicant interrogation, yet she is unaware that she is even a Replicant.

Lining up for the Replicants is Darryl Hannah and a career defining performance from Rutger Hauer, whose soliloquy as quoted at the beginning of this piece brings together a fitting finale that ties up many of the movies deeper residing themes,  which can be easily lost when distracted purely by the visual brilliance of the film.

A particularly favourite piece of eye-candy during this film is the scene where Deckard shoots one of the escaped Replicants following a chase from a strip club, A a rather stunning young lady is fleeing her would-be assassin wearing nothing but spiked boots and a see-through PVC rainmack.  The moment that she is shot in the back by Deckard as she crashes through several panes of glasses, all of which are illuminated by an abundance of neon is one of my all time favourite scenes for sheer visual impact.

The greatest gift the movie leaves for the viewer is that of an ending open to interpretation, is Deckard a Replicant or a human is ambiguous at best with strong cases for either. Fortunately this is one classic movie whose legacy has not been destroyed with a meaningless sequel meaning you can decipher the evidence and make your own conclusions.

It’s yet another IMDB Top 250 for Harrison Ford who was really at the top of his game during the few years either side of this movie, Blade Runner resides as a Science Fiction hall of famer and one of the best films ever made.

1. Gandhi

Ghandi Ben Kingsley“The function of a civil resistance is to provoke response and we will continue to provoke until they respond or change the law. They are not in control; we are.”

There are few movies that have stirred me as much as watching this movie for the first time. Directed by the mighty Richard Attenborough, the film follows the tribulations of Mohandas Gandhi, an English educated lawyer and Indian immigrate who is assigned to a practice in South Africa and is immediately subjugated to horrendous treatment due to his ethnicity. He leads a minor rebellion against the white British establishment, seeking equal rights for all races in South Africa and becomes a national hero back in India.

Upon returning to his home nation seeking peace and tranquillity he finds the problems of subjugation have not eluded him and the rape of his country’s resources prompt him to become the spearhead for India’s claim for independence from the British empire. This is accomplished using a innovative tactic of ‘peaceful rebellion’ or more accurately referred to as ‘non-cooperation.

Ben Kingsley is brilliantly cast as Gandhi and is entirely convincing in playing the hero of the movie, both in terms of aesthetic suitability and the humility he brings to the screen. It’s very difficult to take your eye off Kingsley during the whole film, it’s almost as if you’re watching the real Gandhi and it is truly a remarkable performance considering he’d done very little outside of TV roles at this point in his career.

It leaves a somewhat nasty taste in the mouth to see Kingsley selling himself short in movies such as 2012’s ‘The Dictator’ playing a somewhat stereotyped and foolish middle-eastern politician, it removes some shine from the legacy he build for himself in the Gandhi role and directly insults the magnitude of his performance. That said he deservedly bagged himself the 1983 Best Actor gong at the Oscars and the movie itself taking a tremendous haul of 7 further Oscars. It really is a heavyweight of a movie and is a must see for fan of history, particularly that of the civil-rights movement or the British Empire

In regards to the latter, it opens up some scar tissue and painful memories of how the British treated their colonial Empire. This is particularly emphasised in the excruciatingly merciless killing at the Jallianwala Bagh massacre where up to a 1000 men, women and children were trapped and shot by the British army during a peaceful protest. The movie closes out with the crushing division of Indian Territory following independence prompting the founding of Pakistan and the eventual assassination of Gandhi himself.

A lifetime of defiance in the name of justice, Gandhi established himself as one of the most important persons of the 20th Century and this movie more than does him worthy and is an incredible addition to the IMDB Top 250 and my best movie of 1982.