Tag Archives: Robin Williams

Failed Critics Podcast: La La Late

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Well it seems we were a little hasty this week in recording the podcast. If only we’d have waited another 12 hours, we could have discussed the actual nominations for the Academy Awards and not just speculated. Although it doesn’t seem to matter as we were broadly correct in our predictions and round-up our thoughts in a brief news section to open the show proper (after Steve Norman hosts the long-delayed quiz finale between Owen Hughes and Callum Petch).

Speaking of delays – apologies to those of you who were expecting an episode last week. Fate conspired against us on a number of occasions when we wanted to record.

But don’t worry! Even though record-breaking La La Land was not released this weekend but seven days earlier, we still bung it in with both Manchester By The Sea and animated comedy Sing in the new release reviews. We also found time to run through some other movies that we’ve been watching of late as Steve gets creeped out by Robin Williams in One Hour Photo, Owen raves about sci-fi writer Nigel Kneale, and Callum regales us with his story of a trip to see Labyrinth for the first time.

Join us again next week for our T2: Trainspotting review, plus our usual load of shambolic nonsense.

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The Best Picture Winners That Never Were – Part 2 (1991 – 2015)

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“Now are you a rusher? Or are you a dragger?”

Yup, the Oscars are almost here. The annual celebration of people doing their job very well when they’re paid hundreds of thousands of times more than you and me do for our nine-to-fives. Basically, it’s Hollywood’s Employee of the Month award with an almost ironclad guarantee that winners will go on to do something bloody awful afterwards – I’m looking at you, Halle Berry and I’m DEFINITELY not looking at Swordfish.

So what do you say? Shall we continue my list of missed opportunities and wrong decisions? I promise to be a little less controversial than I was in the first part and hopefully, hopefully, you’ll agree with some of my choices. Only one way to find out.


1994 – Pulp Fiction

The first of a 1994 double bill that lost out to the bloody terrible Forrest Gump. Yeah, I know, I’ve probably lost you already, but hear me out. My dislike for Tom Hanks aside, I simply don’t like Gump and his stupid face. The whole film just bugs me, and the fact that it has beaten a bonafide classic like Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction is just unforgivable.

The intertwined stories of gangsters, everyday criminals and Joe average that blurs the lines between good guys and bad is one of the most amazing films dedicated to celluloid. To spend the two and a half hour running-time with these characters is to spend a tenth of your day with some of the most brilliantly written characters in the history of film.

Between this, and the next film in my list, there’s no way on God’s green earth that anyone, ANYONE, can tell me that they think the escapades of Mr. Gump deserves that Oscar.


1994 – The Shawshank Redemption

Yeah, believe it or not, the Forrest Chump beat this to the Oscar too. Based on a Stephen King short story and current, almost permanent, number one on the IMDB top 250 (Pulp Fiction is 5, while Hanks’ statue thief sits at 13), Shawshank is regarded by many as the greatest film is ever made.

Frank Darabont makes his feature film debut and gets his name known around the world with what is easily the best prison drama put to film. Featuring Tim Robbins and an Oscar nominated performance from Morgan Freeman as a pair of unlikely friends working through years behind bars with each other. With escape constantly on the mind of Robbins’ innocent Andy Dufresne and Freeman’s “Red” living with the desire to just play out his time in peace and quiet; Shawshank is maybe the only film that could beat Tarantino’s Classic to the finishing line if quality of film was actually the standard used for handing out these awards.


1997 – Good Will Hunting

Genuinely, I think this is a no-brainer. Forget the star power of writers Ben Affleck and Matt Damon, Good Will Hunting is a truly original film. The story of Damon’s Will Hunting who, with the help and guidance from his court appointed psychologist (Robin Williams) learns to find his identity in a world where he can solve almost any problem, but can’t seem to shift his own personal demons.

Compare that to the film that won the Oscar that year? A film about a giant sinking boat. And while Titanic may be a visually impressive film to watch, the fact that it’s a love story, based on an unsinkable boat that sank, where the happy ever after was one of the lovers freezing to death in the water while the other clung to a lump of wood to survive? No thanks. Utter guff. And again, no staying power. All these years later, Titanic looks like a CGI laden mess, Good Will Hunting can still draw you in with its fantastic drama.


2011 – Moneyball

Definitely more of a personal opinion for this one than a flat out obvious mistake on the Academy’s part. Based on Michael Lewis’ book, The art of winning an unfair game, this Brad Pitt starring drama lost out to The Artist. Now, I enjoyed The Artist; it was a well made film that, considering what it was, kept me riveted the entire time it was on. But in my opinion, it was a flash in the pan and on second viewing isn’t half as good.

Moneyball earned a handful of nomination in 2011, including acting nods for its star and, much to everyone’s surprise, Jonah Hill. The film takes the mundane behind the scenes stuff of pre-season baseball and makes it a thrilling, interesting, drama that has you hooked early on and doesn’t let go. Its author hits his third adaptation to get a nomination for best film this year with The Big Short (the frankly amazing The Blind Side as also nominated in 2009 but lost, quite rightly, to The Hurt Locker) and honestly, this should have been his first win.


2015 – Whiplash

Now, I know I’m gonna get shit for is one, and that’s ok. There was absolutely nothing wrong with last year’s winner, the brilliant Birdman was deserving of its statue. And even when watching it again, it’s just as good; well acted, brilliantly directed and with a very cool improvised jazz score I would gladly have The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance in my collection.

But it didn’t do one thing that Whiplash did. Not only did the film completely blow me away, but the story of the young jazz drummer going up against his abusive band leader and trying to come out on top left me walking out of the cinema in a state that I can only describe as shell shocked. It’s a state I’ve been in several times after watching this amazing spectacle of a film. Every rewatch leaves me exhausted and at the same time begging for more. The only other film to do that recently is 2016 best pic nominee Mad Max: Fury Road. And only time will tell us if whatever beats it has the staying power that both of these films have.


That’s me done. For this year at least. What did you think? Do you agree with my choices? Think I’m a complete imbecile for hating Titanic and Forrest Gump? Do feel free to let me know. There’s nothing I like more than a good argument over great films!

The Week in Film – 15 August 2014: 26 Years Buried in the Deepest Darkest Jungle

The second entry into our weekly round up of all the weeks film news worth knowing about, as per Steve’s wont. Fury and sadness abound.

by Steve Norman (@StevePN86)

robin williamsRobin Williams: A Tribute

Only a short time ago we learnt of the sad and tragic death of Robin Williams. We have already paid tribute to him on our podcast but such a fine actor is worthy of being paid homage to in writing as well.

If you are, like me, in your mid to late 20’s you will have first come across the fast paced and quick witted actor in family films Jumanji, Mrs Doubtfire, Hook and as the voice of the Genie in Disney’s Aladdin.

A great comedian capable of improvising at the drop of the hat his roles brought joy and laughter to millions.

But he could act as well. He won an Oscar for his role in Good Will Hunting and put in stellar performances in the likes of Dead Poets Society, World’s Greatest Dad, Good Morning, Vietnam and Insomnia.

Williams was a versatile actor who could play a number of roles across a range of genres and was genuinely up there among the best in his craft.

On Failed Critics we made the decision not to discuss the reasons behind a person’s death a long time ago as frankly it is none of our business. However my thoughts and the thoughts of everyone associated with the website go out to Robin Williams’ family friends and anyone close to him.

Batman vs. Superman vs. Captain America

The big news coming out of the world of comic book movies this week is that Warner Bros. have bottled going head to head with Captain America 3 and moved forward the release date of Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice.

You cannot blame them really. Marvel are having a roaring success with their comic book movies with pretty much everything they touch turning to gold, Guardians of the Galaxy the newest in a long stream of examples.

Perhaps though the biggest mistake is moving it to come out before Caps next outing. Come the release of the first Avengers third instalment everyone will have stopped talking about Bruce Wayne and Clark Kent. If they had released it after CA3 it may well have had the same effect.power rangers

It’s Morphin Time

2016 will not only see Batman, Superman and Captain America return to the screen but the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers as well.

If it is at the same level as the Transformers and Teenage Mutant Ninja (or Hero, depending which side of the pond you hail from) Turtles movies then it will be yet another part of my childhood ruined.

Fury to Close London Film Festival

No not Nick Fury, although I would forgive you for thinking that after all the comic book chat.

The David Ayers/Brad Pitt World War 2 film will bring the curtain down on the October festival in the UK capital.

It looks more Band of Brothers/Saving Private Ryan than Pitt’s last venture in to Nazi occupied Europe in Inglorious Basterds. Also starring Michael Pena and Shia the Beef it looks set to be a cracker.

However the film did draw criticism for filming scenes with people in full Nazi garb on Remembrance Day last year.

Next week, Steve will return to give us another round up of the latest in film news. 

Failed Critics Podcast: Oh Captain! My Captain!

The Inbetweeners 2Really sad news this week as we react to the untimely death of Robin Williams on this week’s podcast. Steve, Carole, and James discuss his brilliant body of work, and choose their favourite performances of his for a hastily arranged Triple Bill. There’s also reviews of new releases The Inbetweeners 2 and Planes 2: Fire and Recue.

Join them next week for the return of Owen, and what is certain to be a very emotional farewell from James in his last podcast as a regular. Expect tears, tantrums, and tequila.

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