Tag Archives: Videodrome

Best Films on TV: Christmas to New Year 2015

90545-050-3A0EF478

Every 23rd December, for the past three years, we have released our pick of the films being shown on freeview TV over the Christmas schedule. Last year’s choices were made by Paul Field, but returning to this Failed Critics Christmas tradition is site editor Owen Hughes. It practically guarantees less Carry On movies and probably more big budget blockbusters…

A couple of years ago, we were regularly posting lists of films that we would recommend for the week ahead. Oh, how times have changed. It seems these days that with the rise of Netflix and other streaming services, we’re less bothered about waiting for films to be shown on TV and instead watching whatever we want, whenever we want. Which is great! Except that it’s reduced these articles to annual posts.

Nevertheless, I’ve had a look through the TV schedule to see what tat is being pushed on us this year and tried to sift out some of the dross (although Steve will be pleased to know that The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause is being shown on Christmas day at 11am) and chosen five decent-to-good movies each day in the run up to 2016.

Christmas Eve –

Finishing work early tomorrow? Want something to just stick on when you walk through the door to get you in a Christmassy mood? Well, stick Channel 4 on at 2.15pm and get straight into the classic It’s A Wonderful Life. Alternatively, if you’re sick of that bloody film already, try out the Robert Zemeckis animated A Christmas Carol over on BBC One at 2.20pm (it’s the version that I talked about on our Winterval Podcast this week). If you prefer your Scrooge’s to be real rather than cartoony, then stay up wrapping last minute presents until half past midnight for the 1951 version on Channel 5 starring Alastair Sim as the miserly grump. For those of us who relate a bit too much to Ebenezer, and can’t be arsed with this Christmas nonsense – bah humbug – then watch Karl Urban as the Mega-City One Judge, jury and executioner in Dredd on Film4 at 11.25pm or switch over to BBC Two five minutes later for one of Hitchcock’s best with Dial M For Murder.

Christmas Day –

We’ve had two of the most well known adaptations of Dickens’ novel, so why not start the afternoon with Channel 4 and give the other two a watch on Christmas day itself? Starting at 1.45pm with The Muppet Christmas Carol, they swiftly follow it up at 3.45pm with Bill Murray doing his thing in Scrooged. Later that evening, BBC Three have a double bill of animated movies that are safe to watch with granny, the kids, your other half or on your todd with Toy Story at 7.30pm and How To Train Your Dragon straight after it at 8.45pm. For something not at all schmalzy, sentimental or saccharine, I’m afraid you’ll have to wait until much, much later in the evening as the Coen Brothers change the mood entirely at 00.05am on ITV4 with the hilarious 90’s comedy The Big Lebowski. Or, like, that’s just my opinion that it’s hilarious, man…

JURASSIC PARK, 1993. ©Universal/courtesy Everett Collection

Boxing Day –

It may be somewhat twee, and I’m aware Wes Anderson isn’t for everyone, but if there’s a better film on TV for you to crawl out of your hangover with after getting up extremely late than Fantastic Mr Fox on Channel 4 at 11.25am, then I couldn’t find it. You can time it right to fit in a quick turkey sarnie and a fresh cuppa between it finishing and Jurassic Park starting over on ITV at 1.20pm, reminding you just how good the original was after Jurassic World swept the box office clean earlier this year. Really though, you should be watching the football. I believe that’s what Boxing Day was invented for. Once Final Score has finished, switch over to the horror channel at 6.40pm for the intense Spielberg thriller, Duel. Film4 can round off a very late evening with two modern British classics in crime thriller Sexy Beast (11.25pm) and Scottish sci-fi – and one of our favourite movies of 2014 – Under The Skin (1.10am).

Sunday 27th –

That’s the Christmas movies well and truly out of the way now and it’s Studio Ghibli to the rescue as we kick off the day with one of their most celebrated works, the charming My Neighbour Totoro. Flick over to Channel 5 at 2.25pm to see one of the greatest movies ever made, John Ford’s most revered western, The Searchers, starring the Duke himself, John Wayne. Starting at 4.05pm on BBC One is a fantasy movie returning to where it all began with Oz: The Great and the Powerful, which is actually quite a nice, funny little family movie. You can choose how you’d like to round off the day with one of the following two. Personally, I’d go for one of my favourite discoveries of the year, Cronenberg’s body-horror Videodrome (the horror channel, 10.50pm) over Channel 4’s showing of The Inbetweeners 2 at 11.10pm, that both Steve and Callum tore to pieces.

Monday 28th –

You maniacs! You haven’t yet set your reminder! Ah, damn you! Goddamn you all to Hell! Well, at least until Monday morning at 10.15am when you switch on More4 and watch the original Planet of the Apes – AND THEN later that day you’ll be fully prepared for Film4’s 6.55pm screening of Rise of the Planet of the Apes. At 8.30pm on BBC Three is Kung Fu Panda 2 (read why that’s a good thing in Callum’s brilliant piece from his DreamWorks retrospective). For something a little more… grown up… Steven Soderbergh’s movie Behind The Candelabra (BBC Two, 9pm) features one of Michael Douglas’s best ever performances. Finally, if the forgettable Terminator Genisys hasn’t already disappeared entirely from your memory, then James Cameron’s Terminator 2: Judgement Day will wipe the last remnants from your mind on Film4 at 1.15am.

Tuesday 29th –

Channel 4, 2.30pm, Coraline. Film4, 6.10pm, Master & Commander. ITV2, 9pm, The Shawshank Redemption. ITV, 10.25pm, American Pie. My pick of the lot: Channel 5, 10.45pm, Erin Brockovich. That’s your lot. We’re running out of quality films on TV as the year comes to a close and I’m running out of patience trying to make these films sound interesting. However, if you think Tuesday’s films read a lot like a list of movies you’re glad that you’ve seen once but probably have no intention of ever watching again, just wait until you see what’s lined up for Wednesday…

Wednesday 30th –hobbit

We’ve got a run that starts with ITV2 at 5.45pm and Peter Jackson’s return to Middle Earth (that I actually thought was quite enjoyable) with The Hobbit: An Unexpected JourneyFilm4 will help change the tone to something surprisingly fun with Denzel and Wahlberg teaming up for crime-comedy Two Guns at 9pm. Tune into the horror channel at 10.45pm for some Robert Rodriguez Grindhouse horror at Planet Terror. Furious 7 may have already been voted for in quite a number of people’s submissions to the Failed Critics Awards, but Channel 4 go back a couple of sequels to Fast Five at 11.05pm. Afterwards, prepare for Joy with Film4’s showing of The Fighter at 1.10am.

Thursday 31st –

And here we are! New Year’s Eve and what better way to see off 2015 than with, er, well, The Adventures of TinTin on BBC One at 10.55am. (That was a rhetorical question. Don’t answer that.) More adventures are afoot with a rare screening of The Rocketeer on Channel 4 at 1.10pm and – a Pixar film guaranteed to make you cry – Up, over on BBC One at 2.50pm. I will be at a New Years party by this time (oooh get me) but if you fancy a night in watching movies to bring in 2016, then BBC4 honour Bob Hoskins, who sadly passed away this year, with Made In Dagenham at 10.55pm. Film4 are going slightly more modern and again doing the whole David O. Russell / Jennifer Lawrence / Bradley Cooper / Robert De Niro thing and are showing Silver Linings Playbook at 11.10pm.

Owen’s 2015 in Film: Part 10 – The Revenge of the Horrorble Month

Another month, another article as Owen’s ‘year in review’ series continues. On to October and Owen reviews a selection of the horror films that he’s been watching. As with each of the previous articles in the series, the month will be broken down by week, with a review of one arbitrarily chosen film seen during each period.

by Owen Hughes (@ohughes86)

lovecraft-from-beyond-1986-dThis time last year is where the idea of recording a whole month’s worth of movies began. I set myself the task of proving to myself that I could watch a horror film every single day during October 2014 in the build up to Halloween – and somehow managed to succeed. I dubbed it my Horrorble Month (geddit?!)

Once again, I thought that given how the inspiration for this year-long series started, I owed it to myself to give this experiment another crack.

It was made doubly difficult considering the change in personal circumstances. You know. Entering full time study for the first time since I was 15 years old, back in 2002. I spent a lot of time and energy on trying to work out how much spare time I had, never mind thinking about how to watch at least 31 different horror films. Between all the normal duties I had, like keeping a house from falling to pieces, spending time with my wife and running this website and podcast, I had to prioritise fitting in time to find a part time job (tick), get to grips with my course content (tick) and complete assignments at home (tick).

Needless to say, this month more than any, it has been a heck of a trial.

Nevertheless, I seem to have pulled it off. The trick, apparently, is to simply watch the shortest films you can get your hands on! Especially on those days where you have to spend time watching other movies for the podcast, like new releases and bloody Columbo TV episodes.

Anyway, here’s how the Revenge of the Horrorble Month turned out…


Week 1: Thursday 1 – Sunday 4 October 2015

Thursday – The Package (2015), Dagon (2001); Friday – Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things (1972), Shine (1996); Saturday – CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON (1954); Sunday – The Oblong Box (1969)

creature-from-black-lagoon-swim-aThere were a couple of things that I managed to do during the last Horrorble Month. One of those things was finish off a boxset of 1950’s sci-fi movies that I had. Most of them were actually pretty good, but amongst the best was Universal’s Creature from the Black Lagoon, directed by the iconic Jack Arnold. As a sort of tribute to these discoveries, I decided to revisit it to make sure it was still as entertaining as I remembered. Short answer: Of course it was. From the cast of men all sucking in their bellies when they’re standing around on set in their swimming shorts, to the impressive costume design on Gill-Man, it’s a short but sweet creature feature that’s got a lot more subtlety to it than you might expect.


Week 2: Monday 5 – Sunday 11 October 2015

Monday – The Raven (1963), Macbeth (2015); Tuesday – Tales of Terror (1962); Wednesday – Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004), 28 Days Later (2001); Thursday – Day of the Dead (1985); Friday – Fright Night (2011); Saturday – The Pyramid (2014); Sunday – The Walk (2015), BLACK CHRISTMAS (1974)

Black-Christmas-2006-1Much like how fans and pundits talk about statistics for the top flight of English football by ignoring everything that happened prior to the inception of the Premier League in the early 1990’s, so too do slasher-films often get short-shrift if they were made prior to John Carpenter’s redefining foray into the sub-genre with 1978’s Halloween. Of course, most slasher fans are aware of the likes of Peeping Tom and Psycho in the 60’s, and the wave of giallo movies out of Europe by Mario Bava, Dario Argento, Lucio Fulci and so on. But in most people’s minds back then, slasher was synonymous with exploitation. It took until that stretched William Shatner mask first graced our screens for the genre to be taken seriously by the majority. However, there were one or two others that were often held aloft by critics and movie-goers – usually in hindsight after a poor initial box office run. One of those was Bob Clark’s festive-horror, Black Christmas, about a group of sorority girls who receive threatening phone calls and are eventually the subject of a series of murders. In never seeing, only ever hearing the stalker, it’s the complete opposite effect of Halloween – and yet it still manages to have as much tension and suspense. Whilst I would be exaggerating to say it matches up to Carpenter’s classic on a similar level, it’s still worth watching and definitely deserves its place in history as one of the best pre-Halloween slashers.


Week 3: Monday 12 – Sunday 18 October 2015

Monday – Night of the Living Dead (1968), Suffragette (2015); Tuesday – Grabbers (2012); Wednesday – The Haunted Palace (1963); Thursday – VIDEODROME (1983), Re-Animator (1985); Friday – Late Phases (2014), Beasts of No Nation (2015); Saturday – Masque of the Red Death (1964), Inside Out (2015); Sunday – Zombie Flesh Eaters (1979)

videodromeI definitely talked about David Cronenberg’s Videodrome on the podcast recently, but for the benefit of those who are hearing impaired, I guess… It follows the President of a controversial Canadian television network (James Woods) who unwittingly becomes the target of a conspiracy after discovering a series of snuff films with subliminal hallucinogenic side effects. Cronenberg, particularly through the 70’s and 80’s, picked up a certain reputation, but Videodrome is not just another body-horror. The Wikipedia page actually describes it as a Canadian neo-noir postmodernist science fiction body horror/psychological horror – if you can get your head around that. But don’t worry. There’s still some sexually explicit violence, insanely complex mysteries to unravel and some ambitious attempts to contort and distort reality through the use of various practical (and impractical!) effects. I really need to get a hold of the DVD again to give it another watch. I liked it a lot, but it gives the impression things improve even further a second time around.


Week 4: Monday 19 – Sunday 25 October 2015

Monday – Night of the Comet (1984), The Beast Within (1982), Dead Cert (2010); Tuesday – Let’s Scare Jessica To Death (1971); Wednesday – FROM BEYOND (1986); Thursday – Ghosts of Mars (2001); Friday – Thinner (1996); Saturday – Bad Grandpa (2013), Horns (2013), I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997); Sunday – From Dusk Til Dawn 3: The Hangman’s Daughter (1999)

frombeyondI actually watched From Beyond for the first time in September this year, but enjoyed it so much that I had to re-watch it again during my Horrorble Month. It is genuinely brilliant. From the concept of a scientist using frequency resonators to see all the creatures that live in another dimension, but that we share space with all of the time, to its beautifully disgusting visuals, I loved every element of it. The first hour or so of the plot is compelling and frantically paced, which doesn’t really change or develop in the latter part, but is still just as entertaining in a different kind of way. Jeffrey Combs, Ken Foree, Barbara Crampton and Ted Sorel are extremely good value. It’s blackly comic but with a really terrifying concept behind it. From Beyond is one of my favourite discoveries of the year so far. Much like how Roger Corman and Vincent Price’s adaptations of Poe were in 2014, I think 2015 might properly be the year I delve deeper into the world of HP Lovecraft movies.


Week 5: Monday 26 – Saturday 31 October 2015

Monday – Trick ‘r Treat (2007), SPECTRE (2015); Tuesday – Tales from the Darkside (1990); Wednesday – Fargo (1996), The Prophecy (1995); Thursday – PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE GHOST DIMENSION (2015); Friday – Child’s Play 2 (1990); Saturday – The Crazies (2010), Dawn of the Dead (2004), What We Do In The Shadows (2014), Fright Night (2011), Oldboy (2003)

la-et-mn-paranormal-activity-the-ghost-dimension-trailer-teases-the-end-20150624Halloween this year was a lot of fun. I spent the whole day exposing my youngest brother (18) to a host of horror films he hadn’t seen before. He came over a few years back now and I scared him to death with The Blair Witch Project and the original Paranormal Activity. It seemed only reasonable that I picked slightly more fun movies this time around. All the same, I am still a big fan of the Paranormal Activity films in general. I think found-footage still needs people to stand up for it with far too many prepared to write off a film without giving it a chance if it’s been made in that particular style. The latest – and quite possibly last – film in the series, The Ghost Dimension, once again sends us back into the world of Katie, Kristi and their invisible friend Tobi. Only this time, more than any other, we’re able to see more of the demon haunting another household thanks to a special kind of ghoul-capturing camera. It’s actually not a bad film, but is troubled by one crucial issue. It’s not scary. That’s a pretty big problem right there. But then again, which of the PA films have actually been scary? The first two? Maybe the third? The atmosphere and sheer creepiness of the original is what makes it unnerving, whereas the rest have relied on inflicting diversionary jump scares on the audience. Ghost Dimension is no different. However, it does compensate by rapidly increasing background on the families involved in this series of hauntings and wraps things up to a standard that I’m fairly satisfied with. Let’s not forget, there are six movies in this franchise. SIX. That’s a lot to try and keep a consistent standard throughout. I know they have their detractors, but I’m not one of them. I will be back at some point in the future, no doubt, to attempt a marathon viewing of all of the Paranormal Activity films and I’ll enjoy seeing the story play out in full.


And that’s it! I’m done. That’s a wrap and my second ever Horrorble Month is over. You can expect me back around about the same time next month to look back on the movies I’ve been watching throughout November. I can tell you already: It’s a much lower number. If you’ve any comments on this article or if you simply disagree with some of my choices – or if you want to chat to me about any of the other movies I’ve listed above – leave a comment in the box below and I promise to get back to you!

Failed Critics Podcast: The Crimson Halloween Beasts

beasts-no-nation-release-date-idris-elba

All of you that have never listened before and have seen your family die [from laughing], huh, you now have something that stands for you! That would be the Failed Critics Podcast: Halloween special.

OK, so it is a couple of weeks early, but think of all that extra time we’ve given you to source the incredible horror movies from a whole host of different decades that we discuss during our spooktacular (urrgghhhh sorry) triple bill. With picks by hosts Steve Norman and Owen Hughes, and guests Carole Petts and Phil Sharman, there’s plenty for you sink your fangs into (aahhhhhh sorry sorry sorry).

Before all that, we begin as we always do – with a quiz! Steve is in control of the questions and still 2-1 up after last week’s disaster (get it?) leaving Owen teetering on the edge of being handed a potentially diabolical booby prize should he be unable to prevent a joint Carole and Phil triumph. Perhaps regardless of whatever film might await either Owen or Steve, nothing could truly be more distressing than the news that a Die Hard prequel has gone into production. Still, at least there’s the London Film Festival round-up and Godzilla vs King Kong news to discuss, eh?

We even found time to sneak in a couple of new releases alongside our main triple bill feature. With reviews of Guilermo Del Toro’s latest visual gothic tale in Crimson Peak, and the very first Netflix original movie, Beasts of No Nation, starring Idris Elba, there was plenty to talk about in this week’s episode.

Join us again next week for DE NE- NEEERRRR, DE NE- NERRRR, DE, DE NER NER NERRRR… 007 is back for his longest outing yet with the release of SPECTRE.

LISTEN VIA ACAST FOR THE MOST INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE

DIRECT LINK